Pass the Mic

Looking to make your next business event more diverse, inclusive, and welcoming? There’s no better place to start than with your speakers. We’ve hand-picked a few who may fly under the radar in the speaker circuit but raise the bar in making events more diverse — and way more interesting.

Omar Johnson

Johnson is the former CMO at Beats by Dre, and former VP of marketing at Apple. Adweek named Johnson a “Brand Genius” in 2013, and Business Insider named him one of the “Most Innovative CMOs” in 2016. He attributes part of his success to the diverse team he assembled at Beats.

May 23, 2019

Raël Nelson James: Looking to Make Your Event More Welcoming?

With a background in recruiting, fundraising, and program management, James leads The Bridgespan Group’s commitment to reflecting the diversity of its clients and their beneficiaries.

May 15, 2019

Hattie Hill

The Women’s Foodservice Forum works for the advancement of women and is the food industry’s thought leader on gender equity.

May 5, 2019

Courtney D. Cogburn

Pollak is a leading voice on millennials and other workers in the multigenerational workplace. She advises young professionals and the companies and organizations that want to hire and market to them.

May 1, 2019

Lindsey Pollak

Pollak is a leading voice on millennials and other workers in the multigenerational workplace. She advises young professionals and the companies and organizations that want to hire and market to them.

January 24, 2019

Ayesha Khanna

Dr. Khanna is co-founder and CEO of ADDO AI, an artificial intelligence (AI) solutions firm and incubator. Forbes featured ADDO AI as one of four Asian AI companies to watch in 2017 and Khanna was featured last year by Forbes as one of Southeast Asia’s groundbreaking female entrepreneurs.

January 14, 2019

Susan McPherson

McPherson’s company, a commuications consultancy, focuses on “the intersection between brands and social impact.” This contributor to the Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, and Forbes invests in and advises women-led technology startups and is an adviser to nonprofits, including Girls Who Code.

January 14, 2019

Ingrid Fetell Lee

Lee — author of Joyful: The Surprising Power of Ordinary Things to Create Extraordinary Happiness — is an expert on the way design affects health and happiness. She is the founder of the blog “The Aesthetics of Joy,” which aims to “to shed light on the relationship between our environment and our emotions, and share inspiration for living a more joyful life through design.”

January 14, 2019

Ritu Bhasin

Leaving behind the corporate world, Bhasin in 2010 launched bhasin consulting inc., a diversity- and inclusion-focused firm. Her first book, The Authenticity Principle: Resist Conformity, Embrace Differences, and Transform How You Live, Work, and Lead, was released in 2017.

January 14, 2019

Leila Hoteit

Named last year as among the 100 most influential women in the Middle East by Forbes, Dr. Hoteit leads Boston Consulting Group’s education and human-capital development work in the region.

January 14, 2019

Anka Wittenberg

Wittenberg, the former SAP global chief diversity and inclusion officer, is active with UN Women helping to drive United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. During her time at SAP, Wittenberg helped launch SAP Autism at Work, which aimed to help individuals with autism find employment opportunities.

January 13, 2019

Reshma Saujani

Saujani’s Girls Who Code is a nonprofit dedicated to closing the gender gap in technology. It has already reached 90,000 girls across the United States.

January 13, 2019