What They’re Saying About Convening Leaders 2022 — Day 3

Author: Convene Editors       

Tuesday’s Main Stage speakers Mateo Salvatto and Wanijuka “Wawa” Gatheru wowed CL22 attendees with their desire to change the world for the better. The rest of the day and night brought thought-provoking sessions, lively activations, active chat rooms and social media channels, and a rocking rooftop reception at Drai’s Nightclub in The Cromwell. Here’s a sample.


Mateo Salvatto

Tech entrepreneur Mateo Salvatto told CL22 attendees Tuesday that with the technology that exists today, “Changing the world for others was never as easy as it is now.” (Jacob Slaton Photography)

What’s your definition of changing the world, and when do you start?”

Keynote speaker and tech entrepreneur Mateo Salvatto

Online attendees had high praise for Salvatto and Wanjiku “Wawa” Gatheru:

‘Anyone can change the world,’ ya’ll, we manage thousands of people at events. We can make an impact.”

Atoosa Movaghari, Events Program Manager, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses

‘Society as a whole wins with inclusion.’ Love this.” 

Yolanda Simmons-Battle, Senior Manager, Meetings, AHIMA

Love Gen Z’s confidence, too — PCMA is great at ID’ing younger speakers who appear very secure in their strengths and passions.” 

Sydney Nolan, Account Manager at SoolNua, commenting in the chat room during Wanjiku “Wawa” Gatheru’s virtual presentation


Feeling psychological safety is a requisite to have speak-up cultures, to have these environments where we can have the truthful conversations that allow relationships to grow. And if you have a conversation about business and you don’t talk about relationships or people, I have news for you: You don’t understand business. For those who say, ‘Oh, it’s not personal, it’s business’ — no. Business is personal.”

Stephen Shedletzky, Speaker and Master Facilitator for Simon Sinek Inc., in the session “How to Create a Healthy Speak-Up and Feedback-Rich Culture”

Oftentimes when we talk about [taking] meaningful action, we’re talking about pushing our brands and our companies and our organizations onto people — how can we push it and make it relevant to them? … When you have a purpose that is so fundamental and people recognize it, they will come and they will, in fact, advocate for you. And that’s how you do it: You try to get others to advocate on your behalf in an authentic way. And that’s why communities are important, cohorts are important, and aligning with people’s personal interests is important.”  

Alain Sylvain (above), CEO of SYLVAIN, a strategy and design consultancy, in the session “Post-Purpose: Go Beyond Statements to Discover the Power of Obsession”

I really do believe that emotional design is the foundation of experience design. And if you don’t know about emotional design, go on Google and look it up.”

Tim Simpson, Brand & Engagement Chief Strategist, Design Studio by Maritz Global Events, speaking during his session, “Transforming Event Experiences: How to Deliver Meaningful, Human-to-Human Moments”


One of the biggest things trending in the DEI space is burnout … sometimes organizations jump into something so big and outside their scope, they run out of energy. Think about the things that you are already doing from the lens of diversity and inclusion. [Ask] what is your zone of genius?”

Deanna Singh, during the simu-live stream of her session, “Turning Allyship Into Action: Integrating Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging and Diversity Into Business Events”

They’re showing in this pitch how much they get it as a destination: how to make your talking points but give examples of what to expect as part of your experience. Good example of walking the talk. Really struck by how much everyone’s stepped it up in these ‘pitch’ moments — you could so easily treat it as a throwaway, but people have been really thoughtful about how to use their stage time.” 

Sydney Nolan, account manager, SoolNua, commenting in the online chat room about Columbus’s presentation as host of CL23