What Makes Calgary a Convention City to Watch

A Sponsored Message From Tourism Calgary

Author: Jennifer N. Dienst       

Calgary TELUS Convention Centre (CTCC)

The Calgary TELUS Convention Centre (CTCC) has more than 122,000 square feet of flexible convention space, 47,000 square feet of exhibit space, and 36 meeting rooms in the heart of downtown Calgary.

Although it may sound hyperbolic, it’s factual to say that there are more than a billion reasons to meet in Calgary. Right now, more than $1 billion in new investment is transforming every aspect of downtown Calgary’s convention package, from the opening of multiple new or expanded venues that will make it Western Canada’s largest convention destination to the debut of a more accessible convention district that will allow visitors to experience Calgary in a completely new way.



The latter, officially known as the Culture & Entertainment District or “The C+E,” will create a compact, walkable footprint for groups to meet, stay, and play. The C+E will span both the under-expansion BMO Centre at Stampede Park as well as the new Event Centre, slated to open in 2024. It also will soon be home to unique gathering spaces like the BMO Centre’s new outdoor plaza and pavilion, as well as Stampede Trail Festival Street, a lively new thoroughfare in Stampede Park specially designed for pedestrians and bikers.

Groups meeting at Calgary TELUS Convention Centre (CTCC) will have all of this within easy reach since the BMO Centre is just five blocks away. They’ll also have one of downtown’s liveliest streets just outside their doorstep — historic Stephen Avenue, which is currently undergoing its own reinvention.

When it comes to hotels, Calgary already has an impressive collection. The CTCC is directly connected to the 407-room Fairmont Palliser, 355-room Hyatt Regency Calgary, and 388-room Calgary Marriott Downtown Hotel via the Plus 15, a climate-controlled walkway. Within downtown alone are 15 hotels with more 4,100 total guest rooms.

Calgary Studio Bell

Studio Bell isn’t just an acoustically sound music venue, it’s also an architectural landmark. In addition to the National Music Centre, the nine-tower complex spans several performance spaces, recording and broadcast studios, educational spaces, a museum, and even a hotel and a blues club.

Here is a handful of additional amenities that downtown Calgary has to offer.

Off-beat and off-site — Calgary has plenty of off-site venues to surprise and delight attendees, including the multifunctional Arts Commons (conveniently connected to the CTCC via Plus 15), which regularly hosts arts performances of all stripes; the sixth-floor Hudson event complex, which has stellar views of Calgary’s historic district; and The Pioneer on Stephen Avenue, a multispace venue with modern, industrial vibes.

Attractions aplenty — Downtown Calgary has plenty to fill those free moments, like taking in the 360-degree views from the top of Calgary Tower or a stroll along the finger trap–inspired Peace Bridge. At Studio Bell, visitors can catch a live performance or peruse the diverse collection of instruments from Canada’s National Music Centre. CORE Shopping Centre, one of Calgary’s biggest malls, is also just four blocks away from the CTCC.

Evening diversions — After the day’s meetings wrap up, downtown’s ample inventory of restaurants, nightlife, and live entertainment make finding an after-hours activity an easy pursuit. The Grand and Arts Commons (home to the world-class Jack Singer Concert Hall) both regularly host live music, theater, and more. As for dinner, check out Jin Bar for chef Jinhee Lee’s playful take on Korean- and Asian-inspired fare followed by a nightcap at the whiskey-centric ONE18 Empire, which stocks more than 300 whiskeys, ryes, bourbons, and scotches.

Natural assets — Downtown Calgary’s bountiful green spaces may surprise you — the city is home to the longest urban pathway in North America, which runs through downtown, and Prince’s Island Park and St. Patrick’s Island both sit within earshot of downtown.